Wednesday, December 19, 2018

Traditional Dominican Rite Compline with Music Reprinted

This Completorii Libellus iuxta Ritum Sacri Ordinis Praedicatorum of 1957 was the last publication of Dominican Rite Compline with all the Dominican Gregorian music. It was published at the order of Master General Michael Browne. Dominican Liturgy Publications has now produced a reprint edition  of this book.

Those using this book according to the 1962 rubrics need only sing the entire antiphon at the beginning as well as the end of each psalm or canticle. This book is paperback, has red rubrics and generous gutter margins, making it inexpensive and suitable for personal use. Although it is a photographic reprint the quality is quite good, but you should check the preview before ordering.  A hardback version for choir use is planned.

If you are looking for Compline according to the modern Liturgy of the Hours, with approved Dominican elements, also in Dominican chant, you should go here.

Tuesday, December 18, 2018

Dominican Rite Ordo for 2019 Available

I am pleased to announce that through the courtesy of Breviarium S.O.P. a Dominican Rite Ordo for 2019 is now available at Dominican Liturgy Publications. This Ordo is intended for use by anyone who prays the 1962 Dominican Rite Breviary. It includes a complete calendar for the Dominican Rite liturgical year for 2019.

In addition, it includes the collect prayers for the Dominican blesseds who are not on the Dominican general calendar (so that a votive commemoration can be made of their feast), obits of the deceased Masters General, and announcements of days when Dominican Tertiaries (Lay Dominicans) can obtain plenary indulgences.

Finally, it contains an English translation of the Office of Prime, which was omitted from the 1967 English translation of the Dominican Breviary. This edition also includes prayers for the coming General Chapter in Vietnam and those for the 15 Tuesdays devotion to St. Dominic.

I also remind readers that a simple Dominican Rite calendar for 2019 is available on our left side bar.

Saturday, December 15, 2018

Dominican Rite Matins Music Republished

I am pleased to announce that the Matutinum; seu, Antiphonarium S. Ord. Praed. pro Nocturnis Horis Majorum Solemnitatum has been republished by Dominican Liturgy Publications.

This small hardback book contains the Dominican Chant music for Matins of the major solemnities of the year.  It is a photographic reprint of the original, which was published at the order of the Master General Stanisllaus Gillet, O.P., in 1939.  It does not contain the music for Lauds or the day offices. These are found in the Antiphonarium S.O.P. published in 1933, which can be downloaded in PDF on the left sidebar.

Those interested in purchasing this book should first check the preview to make sure the quality of the reproduction meets their needs.  To order click here.

Thursday, November 29, 2018

First Saturday Dominican Rite Mass, December 2, Oakland CA


This is a reminder that that a Dominican Rite Missa Cantata for the First Saturday observance of the month of December will be celebrated on December 2 at St. Albert the Great Priory, Oakland CA.  The Mass will begin at 10:30 a.m. The celebrant and preacher will be Fr. Bryan Kromholtz, O.P., professor of theology at the Dominican School of Philosophy and Theology, Berkeley CA.

The music and servers will be provided by the student friars of the Western Dominican ProvinceThe St. Albert the Great Priory Chapel is located at 6170 Chabot Road, Oakland, CA 94618, with ample parking available on the street or the basketball-court parking lot.

The next Dominican Rite Mass will occur, after the January academic recess, on February 2. It will be the Mass of the Purification of the Blessed Virgin. Blessing of Candles and a procession through the cloister is being planned for this Mass.

Wednesday, November 14, 2018

Dominican Rite Ceremonial (1869) Now Available

I am pleased to announce that Dominican Liturgy Publications is now able to make available a paperback reprint of the Caeremoniale juxta Ritum S. Ordinis Praedicatorum, published by order of Fr. Alexandre Vincent Jandel, O.P., Master General of the Dominican Order, in 1869. It was the last ceremonial published for the Dominican Rite. It is reprinted in a convenient pocketbook-size format.

When celebrating Dominican Rite liturgy, this volume should be used in conjunction with the revised rubrics of the Breviary and Missal as current in 1962. This older book gives detailed instructions for many processions and other ceremonies in addition to those of the Mass and Office. It also supplies instructions that are lacking in more modern books.

The volume is also useful for historical studies, as it also includes abrogated medieval rubrics along with the legislation that changed them, for example, use of yellow vestments for Confessors, something dropped even before the Council of Trent.

Purchasers should note that is a photographic reprint from scans of the original printing, which is itself a bit muddy. We have tried to clean up these scans as much as possible, but they are still imperfect, and the “gutter” is a bit tight. So purchasers should carefully check the preview to see if the quality is sufficient for their needs.

Readers may find this book and our other publications here.

Sunday, November 11, 2018

Dominican Little Office of the BVM and Other Prayers for LayTertiaries

I have often been asked, especially by members of the Dominican Laity (Third Order) where they could get a book with the texts of the Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary as it was in 1962. I assume that the reason for this is that they were interested in using that text in private recitation of their Office as allowed under the norms of Summorum Pontificum and Universae Ecclesiae.

Through the kindness of one of our readers I can now make available a volume printed by the Order in 1962 of which I was ignorant.  In that year the Dominican General Curia in Rome published the Dominican Prayer Book, fourth edition.  It not only has the Little Office in Latin and English in parallel columns, but also sections of music, devotional prayers, litanies, the Office of the Dead, Penitential Psalms, and so forth. Many of these are also in Latin-English parallel columns. POTENTIAL PURCHASERS SHOULD NOT THAT BECAUSE THEY WERE LACKING IN THE PDF SUPPLIED TO ME PAGES 166 TO 267, PRAYERS TO DOMINICAN SAINTS ARE LACKING IN THIS REPRINT.

This volume was intended especially for the members of the "Dominican Third Order Secular"  (Laity) and the "Dominican Third Order Regular (Active Sisters), but I think it would also be welcomed by our friars and cloistered nuns.

Copies are available for purchase at Dominican Liturgy Publications. Although the scans are good, I urge those interested to view the preview first and decide if the quality meets your needs.

Saturday, October 27, 2018

Rule of Dominican Laity and Priestly Fraternities in Print

I am pleased to announce that the Rule of the Lay Fraternities of St. Dominic, often referred to as the "Dominican Laity" or "Dominican Third Order," and the Rule of the Priestly Fraternities of Saint Dominic are now available in noble hardback editions suitable for use in profession ceremonies.  These hardback versions retail at $14.95.

These editions contain the official Latin text of the Rules and the official English translation on facing pages. We have also made available paperback versions of the two rules for private consultation and study.  They are economically priced at $6.95.

These books may be purchased at Dominican Liturgy Publications. They are the first four titles on the purchase page.  I ask readers who know members of the Dominican Laity or priests in the Priestly Fraternities to let them know about these publications.

Tuesday, October 9, 2018

Domincian Rite 1939 MIssal Reprinted

A piece of happy news has come to my attention.  A hard-working friar of St. Vincent Ferrer Priory in New York City has gotten out a reprint of the 1939 Dominican Rite Altar Missale.  This Missal is in smaller format than the large 1933 and 1965 Altar versions, as it was intended for travel.  Use of it still requires updating the calendar to 1962 (download this on the left-sidebar of there at Dominican Liturgy), and use of the 1961 revised rubrics for collects as well as a couple other rubrical items, but it is eminently usable and in print!

A friar who uses it tell me that since the paper is thicker than that used in the original printing, so users will probably want to get a book-cover, e.g. one for a large Bible, so that lies flat.  I believe it also needs ribbons and tabs.  You can purchase it at Amazon or at many other used-book sites on the web.

Saturday, September 22, 2018

Reprint of the Proprium Officiorum Ordinis Praedicatorum (1982)


At the request of a number of Dominican friars of my Western Dominican Province, Dominican Liturgy Publications has produced a reprint of the Proprium Officiorum Ordinis Praedicatorum of 1982 (i.e. the Latin Dominican propers for the Liturgy of the Hours), which has been out of print for many years.  A copy may be ordered here.
 
I believe that this book will be of great use for not just Friars, nuns, and sisters, but also for members of the Dominican Laity who want to pray the Liturgy of the Hours in Latin with Dominican propers and other elements.

Before ordering a copy, you should read the product description carefully so you understand the nature of his reprint.  Apparently the original was never put under copyright, so it is public domain.

Monday, September 10, 2018

Origins of the Stabat Mater

Eight years ago, I published at Dominican Liturgy three posts on the then new discoveries about the origins of the Stabat Mater.  As the Feast of Our Lady of Sorrow is coming up this week, I thought is useful to gather these earlier posts together.

I thank Fr. Innocent Smith O.P. for calling my attention to the original article announcing the discovery of the famous Stabat Mater being used as a sequence in the Gradual produced by a convent of Dominican nuns in Bologna in the later thirteenth century. This is by far the earliest known manuscript example of this hymn used as a sequence rather than as a devotional hymn. It has been commonly believed that the hymn only became used as a sequence in the late middle ages. It is also interesting that the melody provided matches neither the received Roman one nor that found in the printed Dominican books. This text is found in Bologna: Museo Civico Medievale MS 518, fo. 200v-04r.

The news was published in Cesarino Ruini, "Un antico versione dello Stabat Mater in un graduale delle Domenicane bolognesi," Deo è lo scrivano ch’el canto à ensegnato: Segni e simboli nella musica al tempo di Iacopone, Atti del Convegno internazionale, Collazzone, 7-8 luglio 2006, ed. Ernesto Sergio Mainoldi and Stefania Vitale, Philomusica On-line, 9, no. 3 (2010). Those who would like the full text of the chant may find it at the end of this article.

For those who do not wish to read the article in Italian, here is the English summary:

The discovery of a Stabat Mater version set to music as a sequence in a late 13th-century Gradual from a Bolognese Dominican nunnery, makes it possible to advance new hypotheses about the origins and history of this renowned text. Untilnow there was no evidence that it was used as a sequence before the mid 15th century. The analysis of the piece highlights previously unidentified peculiarities regarding the historical and the liturgico-musical context in which it was used, whilst the comparison with the wealth of textual variants offered by its complex tradition points to concordances with later sources, mainly originating in Veneto and Emilia. As one of the earliest witnesses of this popular composition (there is only one other contemporary version, also from Bologna, but it is unnotated) there can be no doubt about its importance for textual criticism, and, inter alia, it does not favour the disputable paternity of Iacopone da Todi.

Here is the image of the manuscript with the beginning of the chant.



Careful readers will not that there are textual variants in this version as well. The Dominican Rite used by the friars added the Stabat Mater as a sequence on the feast of our Lady of Sorrows only in the 15th Century, thereby conforming the rite to the Roman, which had already added it. But the melody is not that of the thirteenth-century version. Here it is for comparison:



And here for additional comparison is the first verse with the melody as found in the 1961 Roman Gradual:



The discovery of this manuscript, as explained in the article (in Italian) linked above, shows, by the manuscript date that the traditional ascription of authorship to Jacopone of Todi can no longer be sustained. The date, however, leaves open the possibility, often mentioned, that it is the work of Pope Innocent III.

This new version is interesting for a number of reasons. First, this is the earliest use of the text as a sequence. Until the discovery of this version, it was only known as a hymn until the late middle ages. This manuscript shows that the earliest known use of the text as a sequence was among Italian Dominican nuns in the late 1200s.

Next, the text includes not only a number of verbal variants, but also includes two verses absent from the commonly received version. Those who wish to examine these can download my transcription and compare the text to the received version here.

Even more interesting is the music. As pointed out to me by the nuns of Summit NJ, this ancient sequence borrows, with the exception of one stanza, the melody (cf. verses 19 and 20), the melodies of the Sequence of St. Dominic in the Dominican Rite. There are a number of minor musical variants as well. Those interested might want to compare the music to that found in the Dominican Gradual for the Mass of St. Dominic.


Through the kindness of one of our readers who converted the PDFs of this music into JPGs I am posting below the newly discovered 13th-Century Sequence version of the Stabat Mater for viewing by readers. The PDFs may still be downloaded here.

I am aware that these images are a bit blurry; if you click on them or download them, you will get a clearer image.Perhaps some Dominicans (and non-Dominicans) may want to make use of the ancient version on the up-coming celebration of Our Lady of Sorrows.